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Hospital Campus (518) 842-1900   •   Memorial Campus (518) 842-3100
 
Hospital Campus (518) 842-1900   •   Memorial Campus (518) 842-3100
 
Hospital Campus (518) 842-1900  •  Memorial Campus (518) 842-3100
 
Hospital Campus (518) 842-1900
Memorial Campus (518) 842-3100
 
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November 23, 2017
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For more information about Surgical Services, please call: 518-841-7249

Surgical ServicesWhen you come to St. Mary's for outpatient surgery, we know how important it is for you to get back to your normal activities. You have the comfort of knowing your physician is backed by a highly skilled surgical team. You get all the resources and advanced technology of our award-winning hospital.

This 27 bed suite is located on the second floor of the main hospital in the recently renovated East Wing. This unit cares for patients who are having same-day surgery and also cares for patients who are admitted after their surgery. The hours of operation are 6am until the last patient leaves, Monday through Friday.

Our services are comprehensive, allowing us to say that "we are more than just surgery." In addition to the thousands of inpatient and outpatient surgical procedures, this unit cares for the pre-operative and post-operative needs of patients who are having specialized procedures.

There are 5 main operating rooms, including 2 newly constructed suites with advanced technology, dedicated to inpatient and outpatient surgery. There are also 3 outpatient procedure rooms, 1 newly constructed, dedicated primarily for endoscopic and other minor procedures.

  • Services
  • Before Your Surgery
  • Day of Your Surgery
  • After Your Surgery
  • Anesthesia
  • Testimonials

Perioperative Services
Perioperative Services is the name given to a wide range of services that are involved with operations or procedures that may or may not require an overnight stay at the hospital.

Ambulatory Surgery - Any procedure that does not require an overnight hospital stay (also called outpatient surgery or surgical day care).

Pre-Admission Testing - An area designated to complete pre-admission blood work, nurse assessments and provide instructions. Elective Admit after surgery patients are also prepared for surgery in this area.

Endoscopy Department - Outpatient Surgery Rooms - An area dedicated to exams of the colon, stomach, lungs, and minor procedures such as removal of skin lesions.

Operating Room - Five (5) main operating rooms, 3 outpatient procedure rooms, plus one maternity operating room.

St. Mary's Perella Ambulatory Surgery Center - Offers the latest technology in outpatient surgery in a comfortable, convenient setting. Patient privacy and comfort are assured in individual rooms, while family members and friends can wait in the spacious atrium and café.

The Ambulatory Surgery Center includes:

  • A state of the art Endoscopy Department
  • Three procedure rooms
  • Private outpatient surgery rooms adjacent to the five main operating rooms.

A wide variety of surgical and diagnostic procedures can be performed at the Ambulatory Surgery Center including but not limited to:

  • Arthroscopy - a visual examination of the joints of the body (example: shoulder, knee, etc.)
  • Cystoscopy - a visual examination of the urinary tract and bladder
  • Ear, Nose, and Throat (ENT) - Tonsillectomy, placement of ear tubes for pediatric and adult patients, sinus endoscopy
  • General Surgery - Removal of gall bladder, appendix, hernia, breast surgery, bowel surgery (most done arthroscopy)
  • Hysteroscopy - a visual examination of the uterus used to diagnose and treat uterine polyps and fibroids.
  • Laparoscopy - is the most common form of minimally invasive surgery performed today, and is used successfully for removal of the gallbladder and appendix, ulcer surgery, hernia repairs, and lung biopsies. These techniques are predicted to be the first choice for most diagnostic and surgical procedures in the 21st century. Laparoscopy is also used to treat endometriosis and for performing hysterectomies.
  • Gynecological (OB/GYN) - C Sections, hysterectomy, Hysteroscopy, D&C, procedures for incontinence, etc.
  • Ophthalmology - Eye surgery such as cataracts
  • Orthopedic Surgery - Total joint replacements( Knee, hip, shoulder), bone fractures, carpel tunnel
  • Podiatry (foot surgery) - treatment, and prevention of diseases of the human foot (example: bunions or hammer toes).
  • Sinus Endoscopy - a visual examination of the sinus cavity.
  • Spine - Minimally invasive surgery of the spine
  • Urological Surgery - surgery for the urinary system such as urinary bladder procedures, prostate procedures, and procedures for incontinence

 

Please follow these steps to make your visit to St. Mary's as easy as possible.

Pre-Operative Testing/Out-Patient Teaching
Your physician will decide if any pre-operative tests need to be ordered before your surgery.

Pre-operative Testing - Prior to the date of your surgical procedure, your doctor may schedule you for a pre operative testing and outpatient teaching visit. This may include blood work, a urine test, x-rays and/or an EKG (electrocardiogram) depending upon your physicians instructions. These tests are a necessary component in helping your physician assess your body's ability to have surgery; however, not every patient will be in need of this service.

The RN assessment takes approximately 40 minutes; a Registered Nurse will gather necessary health information. The patient will be asked questions about his/her current medications, allergy history, past hospitalizations and other pertinent health information. The area ensures that the RN assessment is conducted confidentially.

During the Pre Op Testing/Out-Patient Teaching visit you will also be educated about your specific procedure.

Anesthesia Plan
Prior to your surgery, an anesthesiologist will discuss with you which type of anesthesia is best for you. There are three types of anesthesia. If you are having a "general" anesthesia, you will be completely asleep. A second type is called "local" anesthesia and means a small section of your body will be numb. The third type is "regional or block" anesthesia for numbing a specific body part. During regional or local anesthesia, sedation may be given to make you feel more comfortable.

  • It is very important that you DO NOT EAT ANY FOOD OR DRINK ANY LIQUIDS (including water) from midnight the night before your surgery unless you have received different instructions from your doctor.
  • Write down and bring the name and dosage of each medication you are taking.
  • We urge you to stop smoking cigarettes at least three weeks prior to surgery. Smoking effects wound healing.
  • If you develop any acute infection (a cold, bronchitis, fever, the flu, or any other respiratory infection), be sure to notify your surgeon. He may want to postpone your surgery.
  • The Out-Patient teaching nurse will give instructions in coordination with the doctor regarding which medications are to be taken the morning after surgery.

Travel Arrangements
If you are having anesthesia, other than local, please make arrangements ahead of time for someone to drive you home after your surgery. There are many important reasons for not driving yourself home, including any lingering effects of anesthesia or medication.

If you live alone, make arrangements for someone to stay with you overnight and longer if necessary, no matter how well you may feel. If you have small children, make arrangements for someone to assist you with child care.

Medication
Before your surgery, ask your physician if you should take your usual medication such as heart, high blood pressure medication, or over-the-counter non-prescription drugs. Some medications such as "blood thinners" that include aspirin or ibuprofen may need to be stopped several days before the surgery. If your physician tells you to stop any of your medications, be sure to ask when you can restart them after surgery.

If you have diabetes and take insulin or a diabetic "pill," ask your physician for specific direction about how much medication to take, if any. Some people take less insulin before surgery; others may be directed to take none.

On the day of your surgery, bring a list of the medication, including doses you take and the times you last took them.

Visitors
Please limit your visitors on the day of your surgery to 2 ADULTS.

If a child is going through surgery, a parent or responsible adult should plan to remain with the child throughout the hospital stay. We encourage you to bring your child's favorite toy.

"Nothing By Mouth"
You will be asked not to eat or drink after midnight unless your physician gives you different instructions. During surgery it is important to have an empty stomach. This includes chewing gum, candy, breath mints, as well as food and drink.

Do not smoke for 24 hours before surgery. Your blood cells carry more oxygen during surgery if you refrain from smoking. You should also notify your physician immediately if you develop any illness, cold, sore throat, cough or elevated temperature.

Clothing and Personal Items
On the morning of your surgery, you should shower or bathe. Leave all money and valuables at home. Do not wear jewelry (body jewelry included) or makeup to the hospital. If you wear contact lenses, bring your container because you will be asked to remove them. If you have a wedding band, it can remain on your finger. A nurse will secure it with tape.

Wear loose fitting clothing to the hospital so that you can get your clothes over a bandage when you go home. For example, eye surgery patients should not wear pull-over shirts and knee surgery patients should not wear tight trousers or jeans.

Please WEAR your hearing aid and glasses and bring the appropriate cases. Dentures may be worn. You may or may not be asked to remove these personal items.

Ambulatory Surgery Center
Upon arrival to our Ambulatory Care Department, you will be greeted and given instructions and take a seat in our waiting room. You will then be escorted to your own room where your vital signs will be taken and you will be asked to change into a hospital gown. A Registered Nurse will then take a brief history and possibly be starting an intravenous (IV) depending on the surgery or procedure you have having. When it is time for your procedure, you may be given pre-operative medications and taken via stretcher to the Operating Room.

Operative Consent
You will be asked to sign several consents: Consent to Treat, Release of Insurance Information, Operative Permit, Anesthesia Consent and other applicable forms.

Surgical Holding Area
If your surgery is scheduled to be done in an operating room, you may be taken to the surgical holding area. The length of time you stay in this area may vary, but someone will always be near should you need assistance or want to ask a question. If not done in the Ambulatory Surgery holding area, the surgeon will mark your surgical site.

The Operating Room
The surgical team will consist of your surgeon, an anesthesiologist, a surgical technician, an RN circulator and other assistants as deemed necessary by your surgeon. The surgical team will be monitoring your heart and blood pressure throughout your operation. IV's provide a way to give fluids and/or medications directly into a vein. They also help speed up your recovery period.

During Your Surgery
During your surgery, your vital signs will be monitored. These include breathing, pulse rate, blood pressure, temperature and strength of your heart. We continually manage your entire environment and attend to your basic needs on a minute to minute basis.

Waiting Room
Our recently renovated and comfortable waiting room is located near the operating room. We offer television, telephone, free wi-fi access and recent reading materials for patients' love ones to use while they wait. Complementary coffee and tea is available in this room.

Once surgery is completed you go to the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU). This room is where you remain monitored by the PACU nurses until you regain consciousness and are in a stable condition. You are released from PACU once you are safely recovered from anesthiesia, symptom and as pain free as possible. You are then moved to either the inpatient unit or back to Ambulatory Surgery. Your nurse will teach you and your family member or friend about your home care needs. He or she will give you written instructions. Once your family member or friend has learned the care, he or she may take you home. The nurse will give you the telephone number, please call with any questions or concerns.

Diet
Begin with a light diet and advance as tolerated unless otherwise instructed.

Activity

  • No heavy lifting, pushing or pulling until seen by doctor
  • No driving unless permitted by doctor
  • Avoid sitting for prolonged periods of time. When sitting keep legs out straight not bent at knees
  • Increased activity as tolerated
  • Remember to cough and deep breath every two hours during waking hours

Notify doctor of the following

  • Temperature of 101 or above
  • Increased or severe pain
  • Vomiting two or more times
  • Redness, swelling, pus or excessive bleeding from surgical site
  • Any difficulty breathing
  • Pain, swelling in lower legs

If you had general anesthesia you may be drowsy. Do not drive, operate machinery, drink alcohol or sign legal documents for 24 hours.

If your doctor is not available and an emergency should arise, please call the Emergency or Ambulatory Care Departments of St. Mary's Healthcare     (518) 842-1900.

 

St. Mary's makes provision for anesthesia around the clock, 365 days a year.

Anesthesiologists
Anesthesiologists are physicians who have had at least four years of specialized post graduate training after medical school. Their education consists of in-depth knowledge in the broad field of medicine which prepares them for their critical responsibilities in the operating room. Anesthesiologists are involved in post-operative recovery, intensive care, cardiac resuscitation, pain treatment and respiratory therapy. However, the primary role continues to be that of caring for our patient's needs during the surgical experience.

Types of Anesthesia

The Four Broad categories of surgical anesthesia are:

General Anesthesia
The injection of medication into a vein to bring about a state of sleep. This may be followed by other intravenous medication and by agents you breathe in. Sometimes we assist your breathing by placing a tube in your windpipe while you are asleep to control your breathing and the delivery of anesthetic agents.

Regional Anesthesia
The injection of a medication around a nerve so that a specific part of your body becomes numb. Although you remain conscious, we can relax you by injecting medication into a vein. You may feel drowsy or even doze during the procedure. One type of a regional anesthetic is a "spinal" anesthesia. In a "spinal" anesthesia, medication is injected into your spinal fluid to numb the surgical site.

MAC
Monitored anesthesia care

Local Anesthesia
The injection of medication into the skin around the surgical site. The local anesthetic may be given by your surgeon. If an anesthesiologist is present in the operating room, it is because your surgeon has asked that anesthesia be there to assure your comfort and to monitor your vital signs throughout the entire surgical procedure.

The Pre-Operative Visit
Since anesthesia and surgery affect body functions, it is necessary for the anesthesiologist to learn something about you. Each patient and each anesthetic are different. We want to make the "perfect match". For this reason the anesthesiologist will meet with you prior to your surgery. During this visit your medical record and laboratory data are reviewed with you. This may be done at your outpatient teaching visit or the morning of surgery.

This is an excellent time for you to ask questions about your anesthetic and about our procedures. Please bring up anything that is puzzling or worrying you. If you prefer a certain type of anesthetic, for example, let us know. If possible, we will try to accommodate you. It is important that you feel comfortable about the choices being made. The members of the surgical team want your surgical experience to be as safe and comfortable as possible.

Choosing Your Anesthetic
Selecting the most appropriate anesthetic for you depends on a variety of things such as:

  • The type of operation to be performed
  • How long the operation is expected to last
  • Special requirements of the surgeon
  • Your condition and medical history, including any medicines you are taking
  • Your preferences

Before Your Surgery

  • It is very important that you do not eat any food or drink any liquids (including water) from midnight the night before your surgery unless you have received different instructions from your doctor. Also, unless your physician has indicated otherwise, be sure to take all medications prescribed with sips of water. (This is so that your stomach will be empty prior to the beginning of anesthesia)
  • Write down and bring the name and dosage of each medication you are taking
  • We urge you to stop smoking cigarettes at least three weeks prior to surgery
  • If you develop any acute infection (a cold, bronchitis, fever, the flu, or any other respiratory infection), be sure to notify your surgeon. He may want to postpone your surgery

During Your Surgery
During your surgery, your vital signs will be monitored. These include breathing, pulse rate, blood pressure, temperature and strength of your heart. We continually manage your entire environment and attend to your basic needs on a minute to minute basis.

After Your Surgery
When surgery is finished, you may be taken to the recovery room. This room is where you remain monitored by the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) nurses until you regain consciousness and are in a stable condition.

Side Effects
The development of knowledge, technology and medication has made modern anesthesia techniques very safe. In general, the healthier the patient, the lower the risk. The task of the anesthesiologist is to use the safest form of anesthetic compatible with good surgical conditions, and we assure you that this is a task we take extremely seriously. Your safety is our number one priority.

There can be side effects from anesthesia. You may experience:

  • A sore throat for a day or two
  • Muscle aches and pains for 12-24 hours
  • Nausea and vomiting following surgery
  • Redness or sore spots on your face or jaw
  • A headache from a spinal anesthetic
  • Soreness in your mouth, dental irritation

Love your hospital!!! I live in Gloversville and could easily go to another facility but always choose to make the trip to St. Mary's because I trust everyone that works there so much. I've had nothing but good luck with your hospital. Thank you for all you do. :)

Jessica, patient

The operating room staff was wonderful. I feel they are unsung heroes.

Linda, patient

From when I walked in the door, until I left, everything was outstanding.

Robert, patient

Everything about my outpatient surgery was excellent, all went like clockwork.

Leonard, patient

My doctor is outstanding, informative, and makes me feel comfortable.

patient

The staff is extremely professional and friendly.

Victor, patient

The staff was very professional and very kind. Overall everything was perfect. After the surgery, the nurse was right there and put my mind at ease and gave me instructions about my home care.

Michael, patient

The nursing staff was excellent and outstanding. They were very friendly and did their job really well.

Donald, patient

I felt the Operating Room staff were wonderful. I feel they were the unsung heroes. They have an excellent Ambulatory Care Unit. The woman at the desk had a wonderful and kind personality.

Linda, patient

The nurse that I had after my procedure went above and beyond the call of duty.

Patricia, patient

From when I walked in the door, till I left, it was outstanding.

Robert, patient

The OR nurses were outstanding, very compassionate, and showed a genuine interest.

Patricia, patient

The nurses were outstanding. They are proficient, caring, personable and interested in you as a person.

Margaret, patient

The whole experience was outstanding and I recommend the facility. Everyone involved in my care was excellent.

Richard, patient

The nurses overall with my son, calmed him down, and explained everything to him. They were outstanding with him and his concerns.

Mark, family member

The nurses were very caring. I have a fear of IV's and the nurses were very attentive to that.

Amy, patient

The overall experience was very positive and the nurses were excellent. It was a very positive experience.

Richard, patient

The anesthesiologist was fantastic. Very informative, compassionate, and sympathetic. Very attentive. I thought he was great he let me stay with my son when he was having his MRI done.

Louis, family member

Everything was great. It was definitely good teamwork, and efforts from everybody, teamwork. not a one person. awesome job, went smooth, glad I'm getting better.

Mohammad, patient

All the personnel was outstanding. You couldn't beat them. Everyone was easy to talk to.

Robert, patient

There were lots of people in the waiting room, but they took me right when I was scheduled.

Carolyn, patient

The nurse got the IV in on the first try. I have small veins and he did a great job.

Henry, patient

The way the doctors and nurses took care of me was great. The doctor, the surgeon, and all the nurses were really good. The nurse that put in the IV was great.

Steven, patient

The overall procedure was excellent. I felt good going in and when I left also.

Donna, patient

Everything was outstanding. From the time I got there, until I left. I've never been treated so well at anyplace or anytime.

Gary, patient

They made sure everything was taken care of. I was happy about that.

Michael, patient

Totally relaxed and very comfortable with the whole process.

Scott, patient

They were right on time and were very careful asking me questions. If I was cold, they covered me up.

Rose, patient

Everybody made me feel very comfortable and I didn't feel any anxiety about my procedure.

Phyllis, patient

The staff that came in to put in my IV and take my information were just wonderful.

Ramona, patient

The nurses were very attentive when I came in and wanted me to be very comfortable while waiting for my procedure. Very attentive and made sure my questions were all answered.

Jessica, patient

The nurses on the staff are just wonderful. They make you feel safe and cared for. I have been to a big hospital and your smaller hospital is wonderful.

Jeanne, patient

Emergency

  Emergency Department
(518) 841-7237
  Urgent Care
(518) 841-3600
Amsterdam
(518) 773-7710
Gloversville
(518) 770-7818
St. Johnsville
  Mental Health Hotline
(518) 842-9111
  Addiction Crisis Services
(518) 842-9111
Please remember that dialing 911 from your phone will allow trained operators to connect you directly and immediately with assistance that is appropriate to your situation.

Emergency

  Emergency Department
(518) 841-7237
  Urgent Care
(518) 841-3600
Amsterdam
(518) 773-7710
Gloversville
(518) 770-7818
St. Johnsville
  Mental Health Hotline
(518) 842-9111
  Addiction Crisis Services
(518) 842-9111
Please remember that dialing 911 from your phone will allow trained operators to connect you directly and immediately with assistance that is appropriate to your situation.

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Ways to Give

  • Donate TodayDonate +

    Affect lives for years to come
  • Attend Our EventsEvents +

    Participate in St Mary's events as a way of giving
  • Plan a GiftGift +

    Make an impact immediately
  • Volunteer NowVolunteer +

    Become a part of our community
  • 1